Archive for the Science Category

We’ve Moved!

Posted in Art, Atheism, Book Reviews, Culture, Dionysianism, Ecology, Enviroment, Faith, Health, Herd Mentality, Humor, Mistress Babylon Consort, Mythology, Networking, Paganism, Philosophy, Poetry, Politics, Psychology, Religion, Satanic International Network, Satanism, Science, Sect of the Horned God, Technology, Thomas LeRoy, Uncategorized, Zach Black with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 11, 2014 by sectofthehornedgod

cenobite red

Join the Sect of the Horned God at their new website: http://www.thesectofthehornedgod.com

All contents on this site have been moved to our new one and many more features added: News, Blogs, Member Info, Satanic Cinema and The Sect Academy to name but a few.

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The Stern Judges

Posted in Culture, Enviroment, Faith, Networking, Philosphy, Politics, Psychology, Satanism, Science, Sect of the Horned God, Uncategorized with tags , , , , on June 11, 2013 by dimi600c

The fact you’re reading this update means an interest into Satanism, critical thinking and a support of various atheist ideas, after all, this is the official SotHG WordPress with the sect itself being an organization in support of these ideas. A variety of issues since its infancy have been discussed, are still being discussed and will probably be raised once again in the future. Issues ranging  from the question of stagnant satanism towards skepticism and the supernatural and onwards to various societal critics.

But how does this all add up? While many are being busy weeding through a variety of images, posting shit loads of pictures, reports, charities and trying to leave their mark by spreading various media articles through a variety of media devices linked to the great communicator (internet), a certain scrutiny has to be upheld. This is the point where the chaff is being separated from the wheat. While the intentions might be considered worthwhile or make up a part of the praxis, it severely lacks credibility by reason it isn’t put where it matters. I see many rejoice when the next blogs talks about “science updates”, stories of religious bullshitting being received with laughter and finger-pointed at while giving ourselves the reason of polishing the “superior then thou”-badge for not having fallen into it, or simply stories and blogs taking a hike and enforcing the idea of intellectual superiority by means of labeling religion as “poisonous”, “a rotting carcass”,…

While these are fun stories to read, it simply degenerates by the fact those are shared in a closed environment where the “anti-idea” is already celebrated. It misses the impact as they aren’t placed in places where they DO matter. With a stern face they can, at best, be labeled as amusing. Is it that surprising some will start taking a hike with it? Doesn’t satanism embrace the idea of progression through conflict? Your take is applauded, but at the very least know what your actions truly are. I’ve found myself repeating this sentence over and over again the last couple of weeks: “put it where it matters”. The stories and updates only “spread” the media, nowhere and not at any point is there an activism involved. I might as well click on the “like” button.

Updates about “injustice” and charities with an asking to sign the petition are akin to wallmart-greeter behavior and I fail to see any “satanic praxis” in that. Put it where it matters.

Juular!

– Dimitri

Trading Faiths

Posted in Atheism, Culture, Faith, Mistress Babylon Consort, Paganism, Philosphy, Politics, Psychology, Religion, Satan Theism, Satanism, Science, Theism, Thomas LeRoy with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 29, 2013 by sectofthehornedgod

full moon

By Mistress Babylon Consort

Bashing religion is easy, and in of itself becomes a faith for those who make it their mantra. Any new idea or cause born of personal passion will initially and whole-heartedly encompass our entire being, but the idea that anyone would willingly stand still on their path at the embryotic stage remains disturbing. It is little more than blindly trading one faith for another. What is the point of that? The scope of this beautiful world we live in, with its often insidious underbelly, is nearly inconceivable in its vastness and we have little time to explore it. But we have to try. Question everything. To build the walls of faith around you, in all its guises, is as good as giving up.

 

 

Keep the Lights On

Posted in Culture, Ecology, Enviroment, Health, Mistress Babylon Consort, Networking, Politics, Science, Technology, Thomas LeRoy with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 22, 2013 by sectofthehornedgod

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Submitted by Mistress-Babylon Consort

From The Objective Standard Daily Blog, an alternative view of environmentalism that questions the modern perception of sustainability. Enjoy! ~MBC

Keep the Lights On—and Shine ‘Em on Environmentalist Nonsense

Turning out the lights for “Earth Hour” is the perfect symbol of the ultimate goal of the environmentalist movement, which is to erase industry—and thus human life—from the face of the Earth.

To genuine environmentalists (as against people who call themselves environmentalists but don’t understand what the movement is really about), I have nothing to say. But some well-intentioned people have been taken in by environmentalist terminology and are innocently confused about whether there is some truth to the notion that we need to be concerned about “sustainability.”

The idea behind so-called sustainability is that if we humans consume too many raw materials (or “natural resources”) we will reach a point of unsustainability, where there is not enough left for us or for future generations and thus we or they will die. Accordingly, the argument goes, we must stop people from using so many “natural resources”; we must curb our predilection to consume; we must embrace a policy of “sustainability.” Hence the various drives: We must periodically “turn out the lights” or “use less gas” or in some other way make do with less.

This notion, however, is nonsense, and we can see that it is if we identify the context that the environmentalists drop in order to get people to buy in to their nonsense.

The notion that we need a policy of “sustainability” assumes that man is merely a consumer and that raw materials are “limited.” But neither of these assumptions is true.

Man is not merely a consumer; he is also, and more fundamentally, a thinker and a producer who can take raw materials from nature—whether dirt, berries, petroleum, or atoms—and transform them into the requirements of his life—bricks, food, energy, and weapons. And when man is free to act on his judgment, he can continually discover and implement new ways to use raw materials for his benefit.

Nor are raw materials “limited”—at least not in any meaningful sense of the term. Of course there is a finite amount of aluminum, petroleum, and the like in the earth. But Earth is nothing but raw materials—of which we’ve tapped only a minuscule fraction of a infinitesimal portion—and the rest of the universe is nothing but a whole lot more. Petroleum used to be just goo you didn’t want to get on your feet or crops; now man uses it to fuel industrial civilization, to make heart valves, to manufacture Kindles, and so on. Sand used to be good for nothing but sunbathing and sandcastles; now man uses it to make eyeglasses and fiber optic cables. Uranium used to be just a toxic metal you’d want nothing to do with; now man uses it to create inexpensive electricity and terrorist-killing bombs. And on and on. There is no telling what uses man will discover for other raw materials in the future.

Man’s rational and productive nature, combined with the fact that raw materials are for all intents and purposes unlimited, makes it impossible for man to run out of resources—providing that he is free to think and act on his judgment, which means: providing that he lives under the social system of capitalism.

Under genuine capitalism (which has yet to exist), all property is privately owned, and the government’s sole purpose is to protect individual rights, including property rights. Under capitalism, property owners are responsible for their property, for better or worse.

People who have worked to acquire property generally want to maintain or enhance its value; they typically want to increase their wealth; and they tend to be rational about how they use and develop their property. Accordingly, property owners usually work to sustain or improve their resources, whether farms, lakes, campgrounds, ski resorts, or oil rigs. And they generally plan at some point to pass their property along to their relatives, friends, or associates whom they think will use it rationally too.

Of course some people choose not to be rational and not to enhance or even maintain their property. But this is not a problem for anyone but them. If someone fishes his lake “dry,” or cuts down all the trees on his tree farm and fails to plant more, or the like, he will suffer the consequences of his irrationality. If he lets his property go to waste, then, when he goes bankrupt or dies, someone else will have an opportunity to make the property a value again. And if a property owner violate others’ rights in some way—say, by contaminating his neighbor’s drinking water—he can be held accountable in a court of law.

The only thing we need to sustain is the freedom to act on our judgment—which includes the freedom to use our property as we see fit. As long as we are free, we can keep the lights on and continue figuring out how to make them cheaper and brighter.

This fact upsets some people. But so what?

‘Going’ Green?

Posted in Culture, Ecology, Enviroment, Health, Mistress Babylon Consort, Politics, Psychology, Science, Technology, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , on April 5, 2013 by sectofthehornedgod

laundry

Submitted by Mistress-Babylon Consort
By Joe English

Thanks to FS for sharing this originally! Daring to date myself, it certainly brought back memories of my mother hanging laundry, in a one T.V, computerless, manual hand-blender, microwaves weren’t invented yet, and cellphones were only on Star Trek, household. Enjoy.

Going Green
Checking out at the store, the young cashier suggested to the older woman, that she should bring her own grocery bags because plastic bags weren’t good for the environment.

The woman apologized and explained, “We didn’t have this green thing back in my earlier days.” The young clerk responded, “That’s our problem today. Your generation did not care enough to save our environment f or future generations.”

She was right — our generation didn’t have the green thing in its day.

Back then, we returned milk bottles, soda bottles and beer bottles to the store. The store sent them back to the plant to be washed and sterilized and refilled, so it could use the same bottles over and over. So they really were truly recycled. But we didn’t have the green thing back in our day.

Grocery stores bagged our groceries in brown paper bags, that we reused for numerous things, most memorable besides household garbage bags, was the use of brown paper bags as book covers for our schoolbooks. This was to ensure that public property, (the books provided for our use by the school) was not defaced by our scribbling’s. Then we were able to personalize our books on the brown paper bags. But too bad we didn’t do the green thing back then.

We walked up stairs, because we didn’t have an escalator in every store and office building. We walked to the grocery store and didn’t climb into a 300-horsepower machine every time we had to go two blocks. But she was right. We didn’t have the green thing in our day.

Back then, we washed the baby’s diapers because we didn’t have the throwaway kind. We dried clothes on a line, not in an energy-gobbling machine burning up 220 volts — wind and solar power really did dry our clothes back in our early days. Kids got hand-me-down clothes from their brothers or sisters, not always brand-new clothing. But that young lady is right; we didn’t have the green thing back in our day.

Back then, we had one TV, or radio, in the house — not a TV in every room. And the TV had a small screen the size of a handkerchief (remember them?), not a screen the size of the state of Montana.

In the kitchen, we blended and stirred by hand because we didn’t have electric machines to do everything for us. When we packaged a fragile item to send in the mail, we used wadded up old newspapers to cushion it, not Styrofoam or plastic bubble wrap.

Back then, we didn’t fire up an engine and burn gasoline just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power. We exercised by working so we didn’t need to go to a health club to run on treadmills that operate on electricity. But she’s right; we didn’t have the green thing back then.

We drank from a fountain when we were thirsty instead of using a cup or a plastic bottle every time we had a drink of water. We refilled writing pens with ink instead of buying a new pen, and we replaced the razor blades in a razor instead of throwing away the whole razor just because the blade got dull. But we didn’t have the green thing back then.

Back then, people took the streetcar or a bus and kids rode their bikes to school or walked instead of turning their moms into a 24-hour taxi service. We had one electrical outlet in a room, not an entire bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And we didn’t need a computerized gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 23,000 miles out in space in order to find the nearest burger joint.

But isn’t it sad the current generation laments how wasteful we old folks were just because we didn’t have the green thing back then?

Please forward this on to another selfish old person who needs a lesson in conservation from a smart-ass young person. — with Joe English

Sect of the Horned God: New Forum!

Posted in Atheism, Book Reviews, Culture, Dionysianism, Health, Humor, Mistress Babylon Consort, Mythology, Networking, Paganism, Pastor Tom, Philosphy, Poetry, Politics, Psychology, Quotes, Religion, Satan Theism, Satanic International Network, Satanism, Science, Sect of the Horned God, Theism, Thomas LeRoy, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on March 4, 2013 by sectofthehornedgod

Aghori

The Sect of the Horned God has a new forum! Head over to: http://www.sectofthehornedgod.wall.fm
This site is an open forum. Start a topic, blog, chat and network.

We want to hear what you have to say!

Religious Faith May Be Genetic

Posted in Atheism, Culture, Health, Politics, Psychology, Religion, Science, Sect of the Horned God, Theism, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on February 23, 2013 by sectofthehornedgod

twins

Submitted by Dimitri, Sect of the Horned God

By Chris Coughlan-Smith
Published on July 15, 2005
In the nature-versus-nurture debate, whether our genes or our environment dominate in making us who we are,research out of the Minnesota Center for Twin and Adoption Research at the University of Minnesota has played a central role for more than 25 years. Starting with landmark studies of twins reared apart, Minnesota researchers have discovered remarkable levels of genetic influence on psychological traits and social attitudes. The newest University study on twins finds that degree of religious faith appears to be tied to genetics. Further, it concludes that the genetic influence grows in adulthood. Behavioral psychology Ph.D. student Laura Koenig (M.A. ’04) reviewed lengthy surveys from the early 1990s in the center’s database. Though the surveys dealt with parenting behavior of twins, Koenig discovered that some included nine questions that dealt directly with religious faith, including about church attendance, prayer, religious reading, and more open-ended questions. Respondents who were asked the religiousness questions (more than 250 sets of male twins born from 1961 to 1964) were also asked to answer the same questions for when they were children.
Koenig has a natural interest in the topic: Her identical twin, Anne, is in graduate school for social psychology at Northwestern, and the girls were raised in a strongly religious family.
At her computer in a cramped, windowless lab she shares with other Ph.D. students in Elliot Hall, Koenig sifted through the responses and saw patterns begin to emerge: Upbringing played a large part in determining respondents’ degree of faith early in life. But as respondents became adults, genetics became a dominant factor, either strengthening or reducing the role of religion in their lives. Koenig drew her conclusions based on the fact that identical twins, who share all their inherited genes, have similar degrees of faith in adulthood, while fraternal twins, who share half their inherited genes, tend to deviate in religiousness as they become adults. Koenig’s analysis was published in the April issue of the Journal of Personality. Understanding which traits and attitudes are influenced by genetics can help psychologists, parents, teachers, and individuals learn how to work with genetic predispositions, Koenig asserts. Plus, she says, simply understanding why people do certain things is an important step in understanding human interaction as more than “a mass of confusing and chaotic behaviors.” Koenig has a natural interest in the topic: Her identical twin, Anne, is in graduate school for social psychology at Northwestern, and the girls were raised in a strongly religious family. “The findings didn’t cause me to question my faith at all,” Laura Koenig says. “It makes sense that parental influence would decrease as you move through adolescence and start finding your own way.”
From Minnesota magazine, July-August 2005.